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Showing posts from August, 2014

Defensive Shift - Turning the Tables on Surveillance

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Like many people lately, I've been pondering the implications of pervasive surveillance, "big data" analysis, state-sponsored security exploits, and the role of technology in government. For one thing, my work involves a lot of the same technology: deep packet inspection, data analysis, machine learning and even writing experimental malware. However, instead of building tools that enable pervasive government surveillance, I've built a product that tells mobile smartphone users if their device, or a laptop connected to it, has been infected with malware, been commandeered into a botnet, or come under attack from a malicious website, and so on.  I'm happy to be working on applying some of this technology in a way that actually benefits regular people. It feels much more on the "good side" of technology than on the bad side we've been hearing so much about lately.

Surveillance of course has been in the news a lot lately, so we're all familiar with…

Repackaging node modules for local install with npm

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If you need to install an npm package for nodejs from local files, because you can't or prefer not to download everything from the  npmjs.org repo, or you don't even have a network connection, then you can't just get an npm package tarball and do `npm install <tarball>`, because it will immediately try to download all it's dependencies from the repo.

There are some existing tools and resources you can try:

npmbox - https://github.com/arei/npmboxhttps://github.com/mikefrey/node-pacbundle.js gist -  https://gist.github.com/jackgill/7687308relevant npm issue - https://github.com/npm/npm/issues/4210
I found all of these a bit over-wrought for my taste. So if you prefer a simple DIY approach, you can simply edit the module's package.json file, and copy all of its dependencies over to the "bundledDependencies" array, and then run npm pack to build a new tarball that includes all the dependencies bundled inside.

Using `forever` as an example:
make a directo…