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Showing posts from January, 2015

Fluent 2014 Talk Summaries 3

"Speed, Performance and Human Perception"
In this performance-related talk, Ilya Grigorik explains that performance is not only a function of speed, but of meeting user expectations in a way that allows them to complete tasks effectively, with insightful examples.

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My rating: 4/5. Provides useful insight on usability.

"Delivering the Goods"
Paul Irish discusses optimization in this keynote talk, describing the "critical path" and how requests impact page load times. Chrome developer tools are used to explain page load sequences and timing. Recommendations include: eliminate render-blocking JS; minimize render-blocking CSS; serve content in the original HTML response and use gzip compression. Google Page Speed Test is a tool to automatically recommend such optimizations.

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My rating: 5/5. Beneficial recommendations for all developers of web-based software.

Fluent 2014 Talk Summaries, continued

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"Reading, Writing, Arithmetic... and JavaScript?"
Pamela Fox, the person behind the JavaScript-based programming curriculum at Khan Academy, discusses how age affects a person's ability to learn programming and says that most 13 year olds are capable of learning basic programming skills that will help them explore other fields like art, history and language.  Visit Khan Academy for more information on their Computer Programming curriculum.


My rating: 3/5.  Introduces a great educational resource for young people. Plus, I've been a fan of Pamela's work ever since I read her articles on JavaScript widgets at Coursera.

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"Virtual Machines, JavaScript and Assembler"
Popular podcaster Scott Hanselman delivers a humorous talk describing how the basic features of an operating system exist in both the cloud and the browser.

My rating: 3/5. Entertaining for programmers, though light on technical take-aways.

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"The Humble Border-Radius"
In …

Fluent Talk Summary: Brendan Eich, "JavaScript: the High and Low Roads"

In this lighthearted talk, Brendan Eich (inventor of JavaScript) discusses high and low-level improvements in upcoming versions of JavaScript. Acknowledging that Web development is hard ("like having a chain-saw in place of a hand"), Eich says the upcoming version of JavaScript, ES6 "Harmony", will address many difficulties facing web developers, with improvements like a built-in module system, observable objects, and many other features that will make "transpilers" and other "syntactic sugar" libraries unnecessary.

The future ES7 version of JavaScript aims to bring many low-level improvements for high-performance and scientific computing, including new value objects, operator overloading, and SIMD intrinsics. New value objects proposed in ES7 include: int64, uint64, int32x4 and int32x8 (SIMD), float32 (useful for GPUs), float32x4 and float32x8 (SIMD), bignum, decimal, rational, and complex. ES7 will also introduce operator overloading and ne…

Dynamic Types FTW

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There's a belief among some programmers, particularly the OO classical inheritance folks, that static typing is a bulwark of security against all kinds of disasters that may happen in your code.  They feel that the compiler will ensure their programs work correctly, by generating errors and warnings and refusing to compile their program until all the mistakes are fixed.

Some developers mistakenly speak in terms of "strong typing" and "weak typing". Put that way, who wouldn't prefer "strong" over "weak" typing? In reality the terms "strong typing" and "weak typing" are undefined in the language of computer science. They're misnomers that people sometimes use to talk about strict (explicit) type definition with static type checking, versus dynamic (runtime) type checking with implicit type conversion.

It's unfortunate that this line of reasoning causes some people to avoid languages that offer dynamic types. Dyn…